Breaking News
Get 40% Off 0
Is NVDA a 🟢 buy or 🔴 sell? Unlock Now

Best and Worst US Cities for Remote Work Job Openings

Published May 08, 2023 12:38PM ET Updated May 08, 2023 04:00PM ET
Saved. See Saved Items.
This article has already been saved in your Saved Items
 
 
DIS
+1.64%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 
DOV
-0.44%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 
CI
-0.46%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 

(Bloomberg) -- Remote jobs are still plentiful, but these days you have to know where to look.

The most remote-friendly city isn’t San Francisco or San Jose, California, but Bloomfield, Connecticut, headquarters of insurer Cigna (NYSE:CI) Group, where nearly half of job vacancies offer some freedom to work from home. It’s followed by Augusta, the capital of Maine, and Dover (NYSE:DOV), Delaware, according to a team of researchers who analyzed the share of job vacancies that specifically allow working from home at least one day a week. The top ten isn’t limited to cities in the Northeast; also making the cut are Lansing, Michigan, and Helena, Montana.

Those seeking remote jobs should steer clear of Burleson, Texas, along with Olive Branch, Mississippi, and Mount Juliet, Tennessee.

With many companies slowing hiring, conducting layoffs and getting stricter about return-to-office policies, there’s concern that remote jobs are getting more scarce. The data, from academics including Stanford University economist Nicholas Bloom, show that the share of job listings that offer at least some remote work declined across many US cities in March, the most recent month analyzed. In Phoenix, for example, remote jobs were 15% of all vacancies in March, down from about 18% over the past four months, while in San Diego, the share declined to 13.5% from 15.4%.

Remote work might soon get less popular in Bloomfield as well. Cigna CEO David Cordani said the company will shift beginning in September to “more colleagues working a majority of time in one of our sites,” according to a March employee memo, which stated that 90% of Cigna’s 70,000-person workforce have been working remotely all or nearly all of the time. Cigna has several thousand employees in Connecticut, according to a spokeswoman.

“Ultimately, our goal is a workforce model where those working in a site are generally more in line with pre-pandemic levels,” Cordani said in the memo. “Innovation and brainstorming are most effective in person.”

Those sentiments could set up a clash with employees who prefer more flexibility. A recent survey of more than 2,000 college seniors from ZipRecruiter found that 44% want a hybrid work arrangement, 33% preferred to be fully remote, and just 23% wanted to work on-site every day.

Peter J. Lambert, a doctoral student at the London School of Economics who helped gather the data, cautioned against reading too much into short-term fluctuations in job postings, but separate research from Bloom and other sources point to hybrid-work plans — rather than fully remote or full-time in an office — emerging as the preferred model for large white-collar organizations. Among hybrid plans, two or three days in the office is the standard approach, although a few big employers, like Walt Disney (NYSE:DIS) Co., have told corporate staff to come back four days a week. 

©2023 Bloomberg L.P.

 

Best and Worst US Cities for Remote Work Job Openings
 

Related Articles

Add a Comment

Comment Guidelines

We encourage you to use comments to engage with other users, share your perspective and ask questions of authors and each other. However, in order to maintain the high level of discourse we’ve all come to value and expect, please keep the following criteria in mind:  

  •            Enrich the conversation, don’t trash it.

  •           Stay focused and on track. Only post material that’s relevant to the topic being discussed. 

  •           Be respectful. Even negative opinions can be framed positively and diplomatically. Avoid profanity, slander or personal attacks directed at an author or another user. Racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination will not be tolerated.

  • Use standard writing style. Include punctuation and upper and lower cases. Comments that are written in all caps and contain excessive use of symbols will be removed.
  • NOTE: Spam and/or promotional messages and comments containing links will be removed. Phone numbers, email addresses, links to personal or business websites, Skype/Telegram/WhatsApp etc. addresses (including links to groups) will also be removed; self-promotional material or business-related solicitations or PR (ie, contact me for signals/advice etc.), and/or any other comment that contains personal contact specifcs or advertising will be removed as well. In addition, any of the above-mentioned violations may result in suspension of your account.
  • Doxxing. We do not allow any sharing of private or personal contact or other information about any individual or organization. This will result in immediate suspension of the commentor and his or her account.
  • Don’t monopolize the conversation. We appreciate passion and conviction, but we also strongly believe in giving everyone a chance to air their point of view. Therefore, in addition to civil interaction, we expect commenters to offer their opinions succinctly and thoughtfully, but not so repeatedly that others are annoyed or offended. If we receive complaints about individuals who take over a thread or forum, we reserve the right to ban them from the site, without recourse.
  • Only English comments will be allowed.
  • Any comment you publish, together with your investing.com profile, will be public on investing.com and may be indexed and available through third party search engines, such as Google.

Perpetrators of spam or abuse will be deleted from the site and prohibited from future registration at Investing.com’s discretion.

Write your thoughts here
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
Post also to:
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Thanks for your comment. Please note that all comments are pending until approved by our moderators. It may therefore take some time before it appears on our website.
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Add Chart to Comment
Confirm Block

Are you sure you want to block %USER_NAME%?

By doing so, you and %USER_NAME% will not be able to see any of each other's Investing.com's posts.

%USER_NAME% was successfully added to your Block List

Since you’ve just unblocked this person, you must wait 48 hours before renewing the block.

Report this comment

I feel that this comment is:

Comment flagged

Thank You!

Your report has been sent to our moderators for review
Continue with Google
or
Sign up with Email