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Analysis-Investors brace for a great fall in China

Stock MarketsSep 17, 2021 04:06PM ET
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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: People gather to demand repayment of loans and financial products at the lobby of Evergrande's Shenzhen headquarter, Guangdong province, China September 13, 2021. REUTERS/David Kirton

By Marc Jones

LONDON (Reuters) - International investors that have been piling into China in recent years are now bracing for one of its great falls as the troubles of over-indebted property giant China Evergrande come to a head.

The developer's woes have been snowballing since May. Dwindling resources set against 2 trillion yuan ($305 billion) of liabilities have wiped nearly 80% off its stock and bond prices and an $80 million bond coupon payment now looms next week.

What happens then is unclear. Bankers have said it will most likely miss the payment and go into a kind of suspended animation where authorities step in and sell some of its assets, but it could easily get messy.

"We will have to see what happens," said Sid Dahiya, head of EM corporate bonds at abrdn, formerly Aberdeen Standard, in London, which holds a small sliver of the bonds. 

    "They are probably working on a deal in the background, but we don't have any clarity and we don't really have any precedents, so it is uncharted water."

Evergrande warned just over two weeks ago that it risked defaulting on its debt if it failed to raise cash. Since then it has said that no progress has been made with those efforts.

Analysts say the bigger picture is that if Evergrande - which has more than 1,300 real estate projects in over 280 cities - does topple, it will firmly dispel the idea that some Chinese firms are too big to fail.

It would probably still apply to big state-linked firms of course, but it comes too after Beijing's clampdowns on big tech firms like Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) and Tencent wiped nearly a trillion dollars off its markets earlier in year.

Contagion from Evergrande has largely been confined to China's other highly-indebted "high-yield" firms which have also slumped, but Hong Kong's heavyweight Hang Seng also hit a 10-month low on Thursday showing there is some spread.

There are big name global funds involved too. EMAXX data shows that Amundi, Europe's largest asset manager, was the largest overall holder of Evergrande's international bonds, although it says it sold most of it before things turned really ugly.

The Paris-headquartered firm had just under $93 million of a $625 million bond due for repayment in June 2025 and around $300 altogether back in March. It now holds $25 million in total. UBS Asset Management currently holds around $85 million of that 2025 issue and is also one of the bigger overall holders.

Amundi's Co-Head of EM Corporate & EM High Yield, Colm d’Rosario described the fundamental picture for many Chinese firms as intact "For now, however, we await the commencement of a restructuring process (of Evergrande) to gather more information."

"It remains to be seen the scale of loss that investors will face."

(Graphic: Evergrande's woe have had big knock on effect for indebted Chinese firms, https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/zdvxodrzopx/Pasted%20image%201631781813184.png)

UNWIND

Back in April Evergrande's bonds were trading around 90 cents on the dollar, now they are closer to 25 cents.

"It was always priced as a risky high-yield investment but what prices are telling you today is that there was some surprise that the government would let it go fully," said the head of emerging market debt at U.S. fund Aegon (NYSE:AEG) Asset Management Jeff Grills.

He added it has been a text book example where investors had been lured in by the 10% plus interest rate the bonds had provided.

According to the letter Evergrande sent to the Chinese government late last year, its liabilities involve more than 128 banks and over 120 other types of institutions.

A group of Evergrande bondholders has selected investment bank Moelis (NYSE:MC) & Co and law firm Kirkland & Ellis as advisers on a potential restructuring of a tranche of bonds, two sources close to the matter said.

Other funds also exposed to the bonds include the world's biggest asset manager BlackRock (NYSE:BLK), as well dozens more such as Fidelity, Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) asset management and PIMCO.

Major U.S. financial firms including BlackRock and Goldman, and the likes of Blackstone (NYSE:BX), are due to meet with officials from China's central bank and its banking and securities regulators later on Thursday.

(Graphic: Evergrande's bonds and stock prices slump as default worries mount, https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/gdpzyqwxwvw/Pasted%20image%201631786557862.png)

Debt analysts hope though the damage might not be too widespread. The holdings are tiny compared to those big investment firms' overall size. Also only $6.75 billion of near $20 billion of Evergrande debt are included on JPMorgan (NYSE:JPM)'s CEMBI index which big emerging market corporate debt buyers use as a kind of shopping list.

Others are still wary though of the wider signal it sends.

"This is part of a self-reinforcing dynamic in which rising insolvency risk sets off financial distress costs, which in turn increase insolvency risk," Michael Pettis, a nonresident senior fellow at the Carnegie–Tsinghua Center for Global Policy, said on twitter.

"Until regulators step in and credibly address insolvency risk across the board, conditions are likely only to deteriorate."

Some veteran emerging market crisis watchers also think the troubles still have further to run.

"This unwind hasn't even really started," said Hans Humes at EM debt-focused hedge fund Greylock Capital.

Analysis-Investors brace for a great fall in China
 

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Comments (6)
Scott McDonald
Scott McDonald Oct 04, 2021 9:53AM ET
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Well they unleashed a virus on the world. Next round they will crash the global economy. After that they will take over America and JB will hand them the keys...Evil bastards
Ajay Uppal
Ajay Uppal Sep 18, 2021 1:03AM ET
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It will have effect on Global banking system and all banks world over.. Lehman like crisis dish is ready, let's see how long it can be refrigerated before being served across Markets..
Silence Dogood
Silence Dogood Sep 17, 2021 3:24AM ET
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The trillion ton onion of off book unsecured debt in China is so intertwined that as the larger "supports" crumble, the rats above will jump if they can. Those that jump late will go splat..
Ivan Ivan
Ivan Ivan Sep 17, 2021 3:24AM ET
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Think of US debt.
Silence Dogood
Silence Dogood Sep 17, 2021 3:24AM ET
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Ivan Ivan  Very different animal..
palmer gossett
palmer gossett Sep 16, 2021 9:20PM ET
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This article is obviously a scare tactic
yan yan
yan yan Sep 16, 2021 8:47PM ET
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its all a show to humiliate greedy speculators, the bail out is foregone conclusion
David David
David9 Sep 16, 2021 7:45PM ET
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China is still the best place to invest and is the only place that has real huge growth ahead.
 
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