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US labor market steadily slowing; wholesale inventories revised down

Published Dec 07, 2023 08:43AM ET Updated Dec 07, 2023 12:01PM ET
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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A sign advertising job openings is seen outside of a Starbucks in Manhattan, New York City, New York, U.S., May 26, 2021. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File Photo
 
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By Lucia Mutikani

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The number of Americans filing new claims for unemployment benefits increased moderately last week, suggesting that the labor market was gradually losing momentum as higher borrowing costs curb demand in the broader economy.

The weekly jobless claims report from the Labor Department on Thursday also showed unemployment rolls declining in late November after the so-called continuing claims hit a two-year high in the middle of the month.

While the mixed report supported economists' views that the Federal Reserve was likely done raising interest rates this cycle, it suggested that financial market expectations of a cut as early as the first quarter were premature.

"There is no cumulative deterioration yet in the labor market that has caused previous Fed chairs to pivot quickly from rate hikes to rate cuts to support the economy," said Christopher Rupkey, chief economist at FWDBONDS in New York. "The data will keep the Fed on the sidelines watching carefully with the risks of doing too much or too little roughly balanced."

Initial claims for state unemployment benefits rose 1,000 to a seasonally adjusted 220,000 for the week ended Dec. 2, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast 222,000 claims for the latest week.

Claims data are volatile around this time of the year because of holidays, making it harder to get a clear signal on the labor market. The volatility is likely to persist into early January.

Unadjusted claims increased 93,761 to 293,511 last week. Claims in California surged 14,057 while filings in New York soared 9,343. Texas reported a 7,698 jump in claims and applications increased 6,481 in Georgia. Nearly a dozen other states, including Illinois, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Oregon reported an increase in claims above 2,000.

"Looking past the noise, initial claims remain at a level that is consistent with relatively low layoffs," said Nancy Vanden Houten, lead U.S. economist at Oxford Economics.

A separate report from global outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas on Thursday showed U.S.-based employers announced 45,510 job cuts in November, up 24% from October. But planned layoffs dropped 41% compared to a year ago.

The government reported this week that there were 1.34 job openings for every unemployed person in October, the lowest since August 2021. Slowing economic activity was highlighted by a third report on Thursday from the Commerce Department's Census Bureau showing wholesale inventories declining 0.4% in October, instead of falling 0.2% as estimated last month.

Economists expect business inventories to subtract from gross domestic product in the fourth quarter. Private inventory investment contributed 1.40 percentage points to the economy's 5.2% annualized growth pace in the third quarter. Growth estimates for the October-December quarter are below a 2% rate.

Stocks on Wall Street were trading higher. The dollar fell against a basket of currencies. U.S. Treasury yields rose.

FED LIKELY ON HOLD

With the labor market not falling off the rails, most economists are not predicting a recession. Loosening labor market conditions together with subsiding inflation have led financial markets to conclude that the Fed's monetary policy tightening campaign is over. Financial markets are anticipating a rate cut as soon as the first quarter of 2024, according to CME Group's (NASDAQ:CME) FedWatch Tool.

The U.S. central bank is expected to leave rates unchanged next Wednesday. Since March 2022, the Fed has raised its policy rate by 525 basis points to the current 5.25%-5.50% range.

The number of people receiving benefits after an initial week of aid, a proxy for hiring, dropped 64,000 to 1.861 million during the week ending Nov. 25, the claims report showed. Continuing claims jumped to a two-year high in the prior week.

They have mostly increased since mid-September, blamed largely on difficulties adjusting the data for seasonal fluctuations after an unprecedented surge in filings for benefits early in the COVID-19 pandemic.

Economists at Goldman Sachs have estimated that seasonal distortions accounted for the 203,000 increase in continuing claims since early September, and expected them to raise the level by an additional 125,000 by next March.

"The jobs market has softened a little more than recent initial claims readings might suggest, but the surge in continuing claims since Labor Day vastly overstates the deterioration," said Lou Crandall, chief economist at Wrightson ICAP (LON:NXGN) in New York. "The sustained increase in the reported number of beneficiaries reflects seasonal adjustment distortions that will be smoothed out in future revisions."

The claims data have no bearing on November's employment report scheduled to be released on Friday as they fall outside the survey period.

Nonfarm payrolls are estimated to have increased by 180,000 jobs in November, according to a Reuters survey of economists, boosted by the return of 25,300 United Auto Workers union members as well as 16,000 actors after strikes ended.

The economy created 150,000 jobs in October. The unemployment rate is forecast unchanged at 3.9%.

US labor market steadily slowing; wholesale inventories revised down
 

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Comments (7)
Roll Over
Roll Over Dec 07, 2023 1:15PM ET
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the fraud must go on
Me comment
Me comment Dec 07, 2023 11:40AM ET
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A less than a half a percentage point increase in claims is a moderate increase. Sounds more to me like a rounding error. Another sensationalized article from Reuters.
First Last
First Last Dec 07, 2023 11:40AM ET
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The article uses the word "moderately" in the 1st sentence.  Not "sensationalized".
Stan Smith
Stan Smith Dec 07, 2023 11:08AM ET
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And stocks up...since when has Main St. been a factor.. its the Christmas rally after all
EL LA
EL LA Dec 07, 2023 10:20AM ET
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When do the millions of newly arrived guests of Biden factor into unemployment?
Richard Warden
Richard Warden Dec 07, 2023 10:20AM ET
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A record 2.8 million migrants have crossed the US border this year so far, and it's ramping up. For now they get all for free from the funny money printing press and us tax payer.
TheLast LoserDon
TheLast LoserDon Dec 07, 2023 10:20AM ET
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and I guess you will mow lawns, roof houses, clean houses and businesses, pour concrete, etc. LOL at the racists on here.
First Last
First Last Dec 07, 2023 10:20AM ET
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Few illegal immigrants have the false documents and are willing to answer surveys for the BLS.
Otb Investor
Otb Investor Dec 07, 2023 10:18AM ET
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It's all relative. So ridiculous to go by absolute yardstick. If you had 100 million dollars and now you have only 80 million, you are still rich but indeed getting less rich.
EL LA
EL LA Dec 07, 2023 10:16AM ET
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Wait until those $5,000 gift cards to border crashers start running out of juice.
First Last
First Last Dec 07, 2023 10:16AM ET
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"AP’S ASSESSMENT: False. People who enter the U.S. illegally are not eligible for federal cash assistance, with the exception of certain Cubans and Haitians, immigration experts told The Associated Press. Refugees and people granted asylum, as well as some other humanitarian migrants, are entitled to certain public benefits, including cash assistance related to their initial resettlement, though it is not as high as $2,200 each month.     THE FACTS: Social media users are falsely claiming that people in the U.S. illegally receive thousands of dollars in monthly payments from the federal government, an issue that has been misrepresented before online."  --  Oct 23, 2023, apnews.com .  And Cuban-Americans are majority Republicans.  Red state Florida benefits most from "exception of certain Cubans and Haitians".
Casador Del Oso
Casador Del Oso Dec 07, 2023 9:36AM ET
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Over 8 million job openings and well under 300k initial jobless claims equals a very healthy job market. To say the job market is softening is totally ridiculous. LOL
JIM VETTER
JIM VETTER Dec 07, 2023 9:36AM ET
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the market manipulation is at an ATH
 
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