Breaking News
Get 40% Off 0
Is NVDA a 🟢 buy or 🔴 sell? Unlock Now

Factbox-When it comes to spending big on elections, few can challenge America

Published Dec 05, 2022 03:01PM ET Updated Dec 05, 2022 03:10PM ET
Saved. See Saved Items.
This article has already been saved in your Saved Items
 
© Reuters

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Georgia's U.S. Senate race, set to end in a Tuesday runoff, will be the most expensive contest of America's midterm elections, capping the election cycle of a democracy that is highly money-intensive.

More than $400 million has already been spent on the Georgia contest, a significant chunk of the nearly $9 billion that the Center for Responsive Politics - an independent research group - expects to have gone to funding the midterms.

Following are comparisons to other democracies in the world.

UNITED STATES VS. INDIA

India, the world's largest democracy by population, was touted by some observers as having the most expensive election ever in 2019, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi won a second term in office as his Bharatiya Janata Party outspent opposition parties. The elections cost close to 600 billion rupee, or more than $8 billion at the time, according to the Delhi-based Centre for Media Studies, with politicians spending big on advertising, giant rallies and gifts across the nation of 1.3 billion people.

While readily-comparable numbers aren't available across nations, India's spending in 2019 was at least in the neighborhood of the estimated $8 billion spent on U.S. federal elections in 2016, the year Republican Donald Trump won the White House. But India's spending pales in comparison to the more than $16 billion that the Center for Responsive Politics, or CRP, estimates was spent on America's 2020 elections, when Democrat Joe Biden won control of the White House. That likely makes America the largest democracy measured in dollars.

BRAZIL

In this year's elections in Brazil, the largest country in Latin America, candidates at all levels of government spent 12.6 billion reais, or $2.4 billion, as leftist Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva narrowly defeated right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro. The amount of money spent wooing voters was likely higher when considering a wave of public spending by Bolsonaro after the Brazilian Congress created an "emergency" exemption to electoral law, which normally limits campaign season splurges.

UNITED KINGDOM

By comparison, campaign finances are relatively modest in many wealthy nations, including the United Kingdom, which had a campaign season of just over a month for 2019 parliamentary contests that led to the election of Boris Johnson as prime minister and set tight limits on spending by candidates. In the United States, campaigning often begins more than a year before election day and regulators put no limits on spending by campaigns.

The regulatory difference helps keep UK campaign finances trim. Candidates, political parties and other regulated political groups spent only around £56 million, or about $68 million, during the 2019 contests, according to the UK's Electoral Commission. To put that in perspective, the CRP estimates about $65 million was spent on one 2022 U.S. Senate race to represent Missouri, a state of about 6 million.

FRANCE

France also places strict limits on spending. During France's presidential elections in 2022, all 12 candidates combined spent just over 83 million euros, or about $88 million, according to the French government. President Emmanuel Macron spent the most, with his campaign spending 16.7 million euros.

 

 

Factbox-When it comes to spending big on elections, few can challenge America
 

Related Articles

Add a Comment

Comment Guidelines

We encourage you to use comments to engage with other users, share your perspective and ask questions of authors and each other. However, in order to maintain the high level of discourse we’ve all come to value and expect, please keep the following criteria in mind:  

  •            Enrich the conversation, don’t trash it.

  •           Stay focused and on track. Only post material that’s relevant to the topic being discussed. 

  •           Be respectful. Even negative opinions can be framed positively and diplomatically. Avoid profanity, slander or personal attacks directed at an author or another user. Racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination will not be tolerated.

  • Use standard writing style. Include punctuation and upper and lower cases. Comments that are written in all caps and contain excessive use of symbols will be removed.
  • NOTE: Spam and/or promotional messages and comments containing links will be removed. Phone numbers, email addresses, links to personal or business websites, Skype/Telegram/WhatsApp etc. addresses (including links to groups) will also be removed; self-promotional material or business-related solicitations or PR (ie, contact me for signals/advice etc.), and/or any other comment that contains personal contact specifcs or advertising will be removed as well. In addition, any of the above-mentioned violations may result in suspension of your account.
  • Doxxing. We do not allow any sharing of private or personal contact or other information about any individual or organization. This will result in immediate suspension of the commentor and his or her account.
  • Don’t monopolize the conversation. We appreciate passion and conviction, but we also strongly believe in giving everyone a chance to air their point of view. Therefore, in addition to civil interaction, we expect commenters to offer their opinions succinctly and thoughtfully, but not so repeatedly that others are annoyed or offended. If we receive complaints about individuals who take over a thread or forum, we reserve the right to ban them from the site, without recourse.
  • Only English comments will be allowed.
  • Any comment you publish, together with your investing.com profile, will be public on investing.com and may be indexed and available through third party search engines, such as Google.

Perpetrators of spam or abuse will be deleted from the site and prohibited from future registration at Investing.com’s discretion.

Write your thoughts here
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
Post also to:
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Thanks for your comment. Please note that all comments are pending until approved by our moderators. It may therefore take some time before it appears on our website.
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Add Chart to Comment
Confirm Block

Are you sure you want to block %USER_NAME%?

By doing so, you and %USER_NAME% will not be able to see any of each other's Investing.com's posts.

%USER_NAME% was successfully added to your Block List

Since you’ve just unblocked this person, you must wait 48 hours before renewing the block.

Report this comment

I feel that this comment is:

Comment flagged

Thank You!

Your report has been sent to our moderators for review
Continue with Google
or
Sign up with Email