Breaking News
Investing Pro 0
Cyber Monday Extended SALE: Up to 60% OFF InvestingPro+ CLAIM OFFER

Sterling climbs after tax plan reversal, dollar also weaker against other major currencies

Economy Oct 03, 2022 04:52PM ET
Saved. See Saved Items.
This article has already been saved in your Saved Items
 
2/2 © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A worker pushing a trolley walks with pedestrians past the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) head office in central Sydney, Australia, March 7, 2017. Picture taken March 7, 2017. REUTERS/David Gray 2/2
 
AUD/USD
-0.21%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 
NZD/USD
+0.66%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 
USD/CNH
-0.22%
Add to/Remove from Watchlist
Add to Watchlist
Add Position

Position added successfully to:

Please name your holdings portfolio
 

By Caroline Valetkevitch and Alun John

NEW YORK/LONDON (Reuters) - Sterling jumped against the dollar on Monday after Britain reversed a plan to cut the highest rate of income tax, and the dollar was also down against other major currencies.

The pound rose against the dollar after media reports of the u-turn to its highest level since Sept. 22, the day before British Finance Minister Kwasi Kwarteng roiled markets with a new "growth plan" to cut taxes and regulation, funded by vast government borrowing.

Sterling was last up 1.4% at $1.1320.

"Sterling is getting a boost as the UK tries to reverse some of its tax cuts," Amo Sahota, director at Klarity FX in San Francisco, said.

British finance minister Kwasi Kwarteng said he would publish details "shortly" on how he planned to bring down public debt as a share of economic output over the medium term.

The dollar, which is up sharply for the year, weakened also against other major currencies.

But, "the big macroeconomic themes have not changed, so take this for what it is, it's a new quarter and a opportunity for a bounce in equities and a little unwinding of the U.S. dollar," Sahota said.

Elsewhere, the Japanese yen weakened past the 145 mark for the first time since Sept. 22, when authorities intervened to prop up the currency.

The dollar was last just slightly lower at 144.69 yen.

Monday's fall came as finance minister Shunichi Suzuki said Japan stood ready for "decisive" steps in the foreign exchange market if excessive yen moves persisted.

The yen has been weakening due to Japan's policy of keeping interest rates pinned down at a time when they are rising elsewhere. After much speculation, authorities last month intervened in markets, spending a record of 2.8 trillion yen ($19.7 billion) to prop up the currency.

"The central banks are getting more active in trying to defend their currencies," Klarity's Sahota said.

The greenback was down against China's offshore yuan and hit a low for the day of 7.0901.

"I think the yuan has strengthened enough that it will give some peace to the People's Bank of China at this time," Sahota said.

The euro rose 0.3% to $0.9825. Data earlier showed manufacturing activity across the euro zone declined further last month.

Reports that the OPEC+ group of oil producers is discussing potential output cuts of more than 1 million barrels per day also weighed on the currency, given Europe's precarious energy situation.

The Australian and New Zealand dollars gained ground ahead of expected rate hikes by their central banks this week with the Aussie up 1.6% at US$0.6515 and the kiwi 2% higher at US$0.5717.

Investors were watching for more news on Credit Suisse, whose shares slid on Monday, reflecting market concerns ahead of a restructuring plan due to come with third-quarter results at the end of October.

Sterling climbs after tax plan reversal, dollar also weaker against other major currencies
 

Related Articles

Add a Comment

Comment Guidelines

We encourage you to use comments to engage with other users, share your perspective and ask questions of authors and each other. However, in order to maintain the high level of discourse we’ve all come to value and expect, please keep the following criteria in mind:  

  •            Enrich the conversation, don’t trash it.

  •           Stay focused and on track. Only post material that’s relevant to the topic being discussed. 

  •           Be respectful. Even negative opinions can be framed positively and diplomatically. Avoid profanity, slander or personal attacks directed at an author or another user. Racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination will not be tolerated.

  • Use standard writing style. Include punctuation and upper and lower cases. Comments that are written in all caps and contain excessive use of symbols will be removed.
  • NOTE: Spam and/or promotional messages and comments containing links will be removed. Phone numbers, email addresses, links to personal or business websites, Skype/Telegram/WhatsApp etc. addresses (including links to groups) will also be removed; self-promotional material or business-related solicitations or PR (ie, contact me for signals/advice etc.), and/or any other comment that contains personal contact specifcs or advertising will be removed as well. In addition, any of the above-mentioned violations may result in suspension of your account.
  • Doxxing. We do not allow any sharing of private or personal contact or other information about any individual or organization. This will result in immediate suspension of the commentor and his or her account.
  • Don’t monopolize the conversation. We appreciate passion and conviction, but we also strongly believe in giving everyone a chance to air their point of view. Therefore, in addition to civil interaction, we expect commenters to offer their opinions succinctly and thoughtfully, but not so repeatedly that others are annoyed or offended. If we receive complaints about individuals who take over a thread or forum, we reserve the right to ban them from the site, without recourse.
  • Only English comments will be allowed.

Perpetrators of spam or abuse will be deleted from the site and prohibited from future registration at Investing.com’s discretion.

Write your thoughts here
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
Post also to:
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Thanks for your comment. Please note that all comments are pending until approved by our moderators. It may therefore take some time before it appears on our website.
Comments (1)
Tre Hsi
Tre Hsi Oct 03, 2022 9:10AM ET
Saved. See Saved Items.
This comment has already been saved in your Saved Items
only Liz Truss can make people think the Boris Johnson era as the good old days.......
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Add Chart to Comment
Confirm Block

Are you sure you want to block %USER_NAME%?

By doing so, you and %USER_NAME% will not be able to see any of each other's Investing.com's posts.

%USER_NAME% was successfully added to your Block List

Since you’ve just unblocked this person, you must wait 48 hours before renewing the block.

Report this comment

I feel that this comment is:

Comment flagged

Thank You!

Your report has been sent to our moderators for review
Continue with Google
or
Sign up with Email