Breaking News
Get Actionable Insights with InvestingPro+: Start 7 Day FREE Trial Register here
Investing Pro 0
Ad-Free Version. Upgrade your Investing.com experience. Save up to 40% More details

Bollywood's 'tragedy king' Dilip Kumar dies at 98

World Jul 07, 2021 09:17AM ET
Saved. See Saved Items.
This article has already been saved in your Saved Items
 
© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Bollywood star Dilip Kumar smiles after receiving a lifetime achievement award from India's President Pratibha Patil (unseen) during the 54th national film awards ceremony in New Delhi September 2, 2008. REUTERS/B Mathur (INDIA)/File Photo

By Shilpa Jamkhandikar

MUMBAI (Reuters) -Dilip Kumar, who won worldwide fame playing tragic heroes in Bollywood films, died on Wednesday aged 98 and was cremated with state honours in India.

Fans crowded outside the crematorium in suburban Mumbai where the actor's body was taken, hoping to catch one last glimpse of the star of "Devdas" and "Mughal-E-Azam", whose family had moved from what is now Pakistan when he was a child.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his Pakistani counterpart Imran Khan both expressed condolences, a rare meeting of minds from countries that have been bitter rivals since the partition of then British-ruled India in 1947.

Modi said Kumar was "blessed with unparalleled brilliance" while Khan said "For my generation Dilip Kumar was the greatest and most versatile actor".

Kumar had been ailing for some time, one of the doctors treating him said. "He had breathing difficulties...We tried very hard. We had hoped he would reach 100," Jalil Parkar told reporters.

His body was wrapped in the Indian tricolour and a police contingent marched alongside a route lined with fans.

Born Mohammed Yusuf Khan in 1922 in Peshawar, now in Pakistan, he changed his Muslim name to the Hindi Dilip Kumar for the screen after a suggestion from actress Devika Rani, whose studio, Bombay Talkies, produced his first film.

He is survived by his wife, Saira Banu, a top Bollywood leading lady in the 1960s and 1970s.

At his residence in Mumbai, Bollywood stars thronged to pay their respects, among them actor Shah Rukh Khan, producer Karan Johar and actress Vidya Balan.

Authorities in Peshawar in the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa said they were planning to restore the actor's ancestral home in a narrow lane of the city.

"We are now working on its conservation,” said Dr Abdus Samad, director general of archaeology department.

TRAGEDY KING

After moving from Peshawar to Pune, in India, Kumar did his first film, "Jwar Bhata" in 1944, which tanked. His breakthrough role came in 1949, with "Andaz", where he played a jilted lover caught in a triangle between the woman he loves and her husband.

That role catapulted him to stardom, and was the beginning of a decade where he made a career of playing tragic roles.

Bimal Roy’s adaptation of Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay’s seminal novel "Devdas" was the turning point in an already successful career, catapulting Kumar to super-stardom.

His role as the doomed lover earned him the epithet of “tragedy king” - the man who embodied melancholy on screen.

"An institution has gone .. whenever the history of Indian Cinema will be written , it shall always be 'before Dilip Kumar, and after Dilip Kumar", actor Amitabh Bachchan said on Twitter.

Kumar said he felt weighed down after years of playing tragic roles. In the late 1950’s, he made a conscious attempt to play more upbeat roles, acting in romantic films like "Madhumati", "Aan" and "Naya Daur".

Another big career milestone was K Asif’s "Mughal-E-Azam", in which Kumar played the Prince Salim, son of the Mughal emperor Akbar.

A magnum opus that told the story of the prince’s doomed affair with a dancer girl, the 1960 film was one of the most expensive productions of the time, but went on to become the highest-grossing film of the year, wowing audiences with opulent sets and a gorgeous musical score.

In his later years, although the hits were harder to come by, Kumar retained his stature as India's first marquee star, whose face on a poster ensured tickets sold out.

Bollywood's 'tragedy king' Dilip Kumar dies at 98
 

Related Articles

Add a Comment

Comment Guidelines

We encourage you to use comments to engage with other users, share your perspective and ask questions of authors and each other. However, in order to maintain the high level of discourse we’ve all come to value and expect, please keep the following criteria in mind:  

  •            Enrich the conversation, don’t trash it.

  •           Stay focused and on track. Only post material that’s relevant to the topic being discussed. 

  •           Be respectful. Even negative opinions can be framed positively and diplomatically. Avoid profanity, slander or personal attacks directed at an author or another user. Racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination will not be tolerated.

  • Use standard writing style. Include punctuation and upper and lower cases. Comments that are written in all caps and contain excessive use of symbols will be removed.
  • NOTE: Spam and/or promotional messages and comments containing links will be removed. Phone numbers, email addresses, links to personal or business websites, Skype/Telegram/WhatsApp etc. addresses (including links to groups) will also be removed; self-promotional material or business-related solicitations or PR (ie, contact me for signals/advice etc.), and/or any other comment that contains personal contact specifcs or advertising will be removed as well. In addition, any of the above-mentioned violations may result in suspension of your account.
  • Doxxing. We do not allow any sharing of private or personal contact or other information about any individual or organization. This will result in immediate suspension of the commentor and his or her account.
  • Don’t monopolize the conversation. We appreciate passion and conviction, but we also strongly believe in giving everyone a chance to air their point of view. Therefore, in addition to civil interaction, we expect commenters to offer their opinions succinctly and thoughtfully, but not so repeatedly that others are annoyed or offended. If we receive complaints about individuals who take over a thread or forum, we reserve the right to ban them from the site, without recourse.
  • Only English comments will be allowed.

Perpetrators of spam or abuse will be deleted from the site and prohibited from future registration at Investing.com’s discretion.

Write your thoughts here
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
Post also to:
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Thanks for your comment. Please note that all comments are pending until approved by our moderators. It may therefore take some time before it appears on our website.
 
Are you sure you want to delete this chart?
 
Post
 
Replace the attached chart with a new chart ?
1000
Your ability to comment is currently suspended due to negative user reports. Your status will be reviewed by our moderators.
Please wait a minute before you try to comment again.
Add Chart to Comment
Confirm Block

Are you sure you want to block %USER_NAME%?

By doing so, you and %USER_NAME% will not be able to see any of each other's Investing.com's posts.

%USER_NAME% was successfully added to your Block List

Since you’ve just unblocked this person, you must wait 48 hours before renewing the block.

Report this comment

I feel that this comment is:

Comment flagged

Thank You!

Your report has been sent to our moderators for review
Continue with Google
or
Sign up with Email