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Chinese rocket debris lands in Indian Ocean, draws criticism from NASA

WorldMay 09, 2021 04:12AM ET
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2/2 © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: The Long March-5B Y2 rocket, carrying the core module of China's space station Tianhe, takes off from Wenchang Space Launch Center in Hainan province, China April 29, 2021. China Daily via REUTERS 2/2

By Ryan Woo

BEIJING (Reuters) -Remnants of China's biggest rocket landed in the Indian Ocean on Sunday, with most of its components destroyed upon re-entry into the atmosphere, ending days of speculation over where the debris would hit but drawing U.S. criticism over lack of transparency.

The coordinates given by Chinese state media, citing the China Manned Space Engineering Office, put the point of impact in the ocean, west of the Maldives archipelago.

Debris from the Long March 5B has had some people looking warily skyward since it blasted off from China's Hainan island on April 29, but the China Manned Space Engineering Office said most of the debris was burnt up in the atmosphere.

State media reported parts of the rocket re-entered the atmosphere at 10:24 a.m. Beijing time (0224 GMT) and landed at a location with the coordinates of longitude 72.47 degrees east and latitude 2.65 degrees north.

The U.S. Space command confirmed the re-entry of the rocket over the Arabian Peninsula, but said it was unknown if the debris impacted land or water.

"The exact location of the impact and the span of debris, both of which are unknown at this time, will not be released by U.S. Space Command," it said in a statement on its website.

The Long March was the second deployment of the 5B variant since its maiden flight in May 2020. Last year, pieces from the first Long March 5B fell on Ivory Coast, damaging several buildings. No injuries were reported.

"Spacefaring nations must minimize the risks to people and property on Earth of re-entries of space objects and maximize transparency regarding those operations," NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, a former senator and astronaut who was picked for the role in March, said in a statement after the re-entry.

"It is clear that China is failing to meet responsible standards regarding their space debris."

ANXIETY OVER POTENTIAL DEBRIS ZONE

With most of the Earth's surface covered by water, the odds of populated area on land being hit had been low, and the likelihood of injuries even lower, according to experts.

But uncertainty over the rocket's orbital decay and China's failure to issue stronger reassurances in the run-up to the re-entry fuelled anxiety.

"It is critical that China and all spacefaring nations and commercial entities act responsibly and transparently in space to ensure the safety, stability, security, and long-term sustainability of outer space activities," Nelson said.

Harvard-based astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell told Reuters that the potential debris zone could have been as far north as New York, Madrid or Beijing, and as far south as southern Chile and Wellington, New Zealand.

Since large chunks of the NASA space station Skylab fell from orbit in July 1979 and landed in Australia, most countries have sought to avoid such uncontrolled re-entries through their spacecraft design, McDowell said.

"It makes the Chinese rocket designers look lazy that they didn't address this," said McDowell.

The Global Times, a Chinese tabloid, dismissed as "Western hype" concerns the rocket was "out of control" and could cause damage.

"It is common practice across the world for upper stages of rockets to burn up while reentering the atmosphere," Wang Wenbin, a spokesman at China's foreign ministry, said at a regular media briefing on May 7.

"To my knowledge, the upper stage of this rocket has been deactivated, which means most of its parts will burn up upon re-entry, making the likelihood of damage to aviation or ground facilities and activities extremely low," Wang said at the time.

The rocket, which put into orbit an unmanned Tianhe module containing what will become living quarters for three crew on a permanent Chinese space station, will be followed by 10 more missions to complete the station by 2022.

Chinese rocket debris lands in Indian Ocean, draws criticism from NASA
 

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Comments (6)
Simon Liu
Simon Liu May 09, 2021 4:34AM ET
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Americans cheer for Musk's rocket when it smashed back down to the earth and call it magnificate, but, blaming China based on nothing but guessing.Great US has made more than 60% space rubbish around the earth.
Tan Meng
Tan Meng May 09, 2021 3:11AM ET
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Debris by Chinese is definitely a no no and not good for the world. But if US can say OK to Japan dumping nuclear waters, then such debris is so minor to even begin with. If US want to create something out of nothing, then feed your Americans with nuclear waste water, and justified it is safe to drink, before we even start talking.
Sridhar N Rao
Sridhar N Rao May 09, 2021 1:24AM ET
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It is not as if all rockets launched by US stayed safe. A few fell just like this Chinese piece. It might happen for any initiative. But, there is one difference. US and other nations reported and acted responsibly, while China did not. Like Europe of the past few centuries, China is going to be the new Colonial Master of weaker nations in the decades to come. And, western economists and journalists will keep predicting the imminent downfall of Chinese economy, which they have been doing for over 30 - 40 years now!
Mr KP
Mr KP May 09, 2021 1:13AM ET
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as usual , for China human life is nothing, otherwise they would not have created Covid 19 ...
Gary SKY saw
Gary SKY saw May 09, 2021 1:13AM ET
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Yup, you are right, should have fallen on to your head
Al Gore
Al Gore May 09, 2021 12:53AM ET
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very good
danny Levine
danny Levine May 09, 2021 12:15AM ET
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media fear mongering has no bottom line. first covid, now this s h!t
 
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