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Oil rises to 2-month high on tight supplies, EU seeks Russian crude ban

Commodities May 26, 2022 03:25PM ET
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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A flame burns from a tower at Vankorskoye oil field owned by Rosneft company north of the Russian Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk March 25, 2015. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin/File Photo

By Scott DiSavino

NEW YORK (Reuters) -Oil prices climbed about 3% to a two-month high on Thursday on signs of tight supply ahead of U.S. summer driving season, as the European Union (EU) wrangled with Hungary over plans to ban crude imports from Russia over its invasion of Ukraine.

Traders also noted oil prices followed a rise in equities and some weakening of the U.S. dollar against a basket of currencies, which makes oil cheaper when purchased in other currencies. [.N][USD/]

Brent (LCOc1) futures rose $3.37, or 3.0%, to settle at $117.40 a barrel, while U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude rose $3.76, or 3.4%, to settle at $114.09.

After rising for six days in a row, Brent closed at its highest since March 25. WTI settled at its highest since May 16.

"Crude prices rose as a tight oil market was going to remain in place given the start of the summer driving season was going to keep a downward trajectory for U.S. stockpiles," said Edward Moya, senior market analyst at data and analytics firm OANDA.

Prices drew support from a big weekly drawdown in U.S. crude inventories, reported on Wednesday. [EIA/S]

"The fundamental backdrop ... is getting price supportive ... and will turn even more bullish once the EU sanctions on Russian oil sales are endorsed by all parties involved," PVM Oil's Tamas Varga said.

European Council President Charles Michel said he was confident an agreement can be reached before the council's next meeting on May 30.

Hungary remains a stumbling block, as EU sanctions require unanimous support. Hungary is pressing for about 750 million euros ($800 million) to upgrade its refineries and expand a pipeline from Croatia.

Even without a formal ban, much less Russian oil is available as buyers and trading houses have avoided suppliers from the country.

Russia's oil production should decline to 480-500 million tonnes this year from 524 million tonnes in 2021, state-run news agency RIA reported, citing Deputy Prime Minister Alexander Novak.

OPEC+ meets on June 2 and is expected to stick to last year's deal to raise July output targets by 432,000 barrels per day, six OPEC+ sources told Reuters, rebuffing Western calls for a faster increase to control prices.

Other factors also are supporting oil prices.

"Shanghai is preparing to reopen after a two-month lockdown, while the U.S. peak driving season begins with the Memorial Day weekend," said Sugandha Sachdeva, vice president of commodities research at Religare Broking. The United States celebrates Memorial Day on Monday.

The U.S. government confiscated an Iranian oil cargo held on a Russian-operated ship near Greece and will send the cargo to the United States aboard another vessel.

Britain, meanwhile, announced a 25% windfall tax on oil and gas producers' profits, alongside a 15 billion pound ($18.9 billion) package of support for households struggling to pay energy bills.

Hungary announced new windfall taxes worth 800 billion forints ($2.19 billion) on "extra profits" earned by banks, energy companies and other firms.

($1 = 0.9348 euros)

($1 = 0.7942 pounds)

($1 = 365.7200 forints)

Oil rises to 2-month high on tight supplies, EU seeks Russian crude ban
 

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Comments (6)
Benjamin USA
Benjamin USA May 27, 2022 1:51AM ET
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Russian crude go follow moskva
Pawel Mazi
Pawel Mazi May 26, 2022 3:52PM ET
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what tight supply .. that is bs .. artificial pump without reason
sivaji mane
sivaji mane May 26, 2022 2:23PM ET
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what you want to do... normal people also struggling ...if Russia ban oil what you will do.....he don't care what you will ...Nato should think about that
Silvio Marano
Silvio Marano May 26, 2022 12:36PM ET
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Those sanctions are absurd. In this way the sanctioned can earn more money selling less oil to the rest of the world that doesn't support sanctions, offsetting the diminished export, due to the speculation price hike on global prices, while the economy of the oil importers in EU will be ruined.
jason xx
jason xx May 26, 2022 12:36PM ET
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Doubt it
Silvio Marano
Silvio Marano May 26, 2022 12:36PM ET
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jason xx  Doubt what? To simplify the concept, if a raw material price is doubled due to "sanction thing", the raw material exporter earn same amount of money selling just half of the quantity exported normally, this is the offset I’m talking about. The absurd price hike on energy commodities in these months isn't due to any real problem of scarcity but exactly due to financial speculation around sanctions, and more the sanctions stretch the situation on the global market more the importer countries are damaged.  Not mentioning the systemic recessive effects caused by inflation.
Gustavo Gomez
Gustavo Gomez May 26, 2022 12:35PM ET
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Hard to understand why oil is up. If russian oil is banned by EU, india and china will source from russia
damian Damian
damian Damian May 26, 2022 7:55AM ET
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What ban, previous news it said they not even close with that
 
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