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U.S. asks Australia to scrap proposed laws to make Facebook, Google pay for news

TechnologyJan 18, 2021 06:35PM ET
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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc's F8 developers conference in San Jose

By Paulina Duran

SYDNEY (Reuters) - The U.S. government has asked Australia to scrap proposed laws that will make it the first country in the world to force Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) and Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOGL) Inc's Google to pay for news sourced from local media outlets.

In a submission asking the government to "suspend" the plans, assistant U.S. trade representatives Daniel Bahar and Karl Ehlers, suggested Australia instead "further study the markets, and if appropriate, develop a voluntary code."

Under the law, which has broad political support and is currently before a senate committee, Google and Facebook will be subject to mandatory price arbitration if a commercial agreement on payments to Australian media cannot be reached.

"The U.S. Government is concerned that an attempt, through legislation, to regulate the competitive positions of specific players ... to the clear detriment of two U.S. firms, may result in harmful outcomes," said in the document, under the letterhead of the Executive Office of the President.

Such a move could also "raise concerns with respect to Australia's international trade obligations," it said.

The Australian government announced the legislation last month after an investigation found the tech giants held too much market power in the media industry, a situation it said posed a potential threat to a well-functioning democracy.

Asked for a response to the U.S. submission, Australian Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said in a statement the government "is committed to proceeding with a mandatory code" that would address "the bargaining power imbalances with digital platforms and media companies."

The code followed an 18-month review by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) Chairman and "extensive consultation" that included the views of both Google and Facebook, he added.

The ACCC inquiry found that for every A$100 of online advertising spend, A$53 goes to Google, A$28 to Facebook and A$19 to other media companies.

Following intense but unsuccessful lobbying of the Australian government from both tech giants to scrap the proposed laws, which they deem unfair, Google and Facebook have suggested they may be forced to limit their offerings in the country.

($1 = 1.3014 Australian dollars)

U.S. asks Australia to scrap proposed laws to make Facebook, Google pay for news
 

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Comments (6)
Al Morrison
Al Morrison Jan 18, 2021 10:42PM ET
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Makes sense to me, why should Google and Favebook profit from someone elses news?
Tim Daly
Tim Daly Jan 18, 2021 8:30PM ET
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Make FB and Google pay through the nose. Their pockets are deep and they will squeeze you if you let them.
Gary SKY saw
Gary SKY saw Jan 18, 2021 8:26PM ET
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Yes America.. I bow down to you.. Whatever you want I will do it for you.. That's Australian.. American ******smells better..
Brook Buck
Brook Buck Jan 18, 2021 8:19PM ET
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Google and FB has too much much power on the distribution of information on the internet. Together they have about 80% market share. I am with the small guy and fair competition.
Allen Knicely
Allen Knicely Jan 18, 2021 7:02PM ET
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Social media giants have too much power. We need more players in the market. It's coming. FB, Twitter, and YouTube are pushing too hard.
William King
Solyad Jan 18, 2021 6:45PM ET
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Make them pay, it's not like they can't afford it. By the way, feel free to hammer them over the obscene censorship they've been engaging in for the past several months.
 
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