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U.S. to formally seek extradition of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou: Globe and Mail

Stock MarketsJan 22, 2019 03:59AM ET
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© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: Handout of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei Technologies Co Ltd's chief financial officer (CFO)

(Reuters) - The United States will proceed with the formal extradition from Canada of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou, Canada's ambassador to the United States told the Globe and Mail, as Beijing vowed to respond to Washington's actions.

David MacNaughton, in an interview with the Canadian newspaper published on Monday, said the United States has told Canada it will request Meng's extradition, but he did not say when the request will be made.

The deadline for filing is Jan. 30, or 60 days after Meng was arrested on Dec. 1 in Vancouver.

Meng, the daughter of Huawei Technologies Co Ltd [HWT.UL] founder Ren Zhengfei, was arrested at the request of the United States over alleged violations of U.S. sanctions on Iran. She was released on bail last month and is due in court in Vancouver on Feb. 6.

Relations between China and Canada turned frosty after the arrest, with China detaining two Canadian citizens and sentencing to death a Canadian man previously found guilty of drug smuggling.

Beijing has not tied any of the three Canadians' cases to Meng's arrest, but has warned of severe consequences if she was not immediately released. Western and former Canadian diplomats have said they have no doubt the cases are linked.

Huawei, the world's biggest maker of telecommunications equipment, said it had no comment on ongoing legal proceedings when contacted by Reuters on Tuesday. A U.S. Justice Department spokesman said: "We will comment through our filings."

The Canadian Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment outside regular business hours.

China's Foreign Ministry on Tuesday reiterated calls for Meng's immediate release and said her case clearly was "not a regular judicial case".

Anyone with fair judgment would determine that Canada made a "serious mistake" in this matter, ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told a regular news briefing.

"Canada and the United States arbitrarily abused their bilateral extradition treaty to seriously infringe upon a Chinese citizen's security and legal rights," Hua said.

China "strongly urges" the United States to correct its "mistake", cancel the arrest order for Meng, and not make a formal extradition request, she added.

Asked if China would retaliate against the United States if Meng is extradited, Hua said, "China will, of course, respond to U.S. actions." She did not elaborate.

"PAYING THE PRICE"

Canada is one of over 100 countries with which the United States has extradition treaties.

Once a formal request is received, a Canadian court must determine within 30 days if there is sufficient evidence to support extradition, and Canada's Minister of Justice must give a formal order.

In an article published on Monday, a former Canadian spy chief said Canada should ban Huawei from supplying equipment for next-generation telecoms networks, while Canada's government is studying any security implications.

Some of Canada's allies such as the United States and Australia have already imposed restrictions on using Huawei equipment, citing the risk of it being used for espionage.

Huawei has repeatedly said such concerns are unfounded, while China's ambassador to Canada last week said there would be repercussions if Ottawa blocked Huawei.

In Monday's interview, MacNaughton said he had complained to the United States that Canada was suffering from Chinese revenge for an arrest made at the U.S.'s request.

"We don't like that it is our citizens who are being punished," the Globe and Mail cited MacNaughton as saying. "(The Americans) are the ones seeking to have the full force of American law brought against (Ms. Meng) and yet we are the ones who are paying the price. Our citizens are."

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau previously said China was arbitrarily using the death penalty and called on world leaders to raise concerns about the detained Canadians.

U.S. to formally seek extradition of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou: Globe and Mail
 

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Suman Jutur
Suman Jutur Jan 22, 2019 8:36AM ET
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Trudeau is a nut. He needs to govern Canada as a sovereign nation and not as the 51st state of the US. Canada lacks leadership.
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Chris Sundo
Chris Sundo Jan 22, 2019 6:26AM ET
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Just like Danske bank is being sued Huawei should be sued if there was any financial loss caused by their reckless ceo's actions...https://www.investing.com/news/stock-market-news/danske-faces-new-investor-lawsuit-threat-1753055
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Chris Sundo
Chris Sundo Jan 22, 2019 4:25AM ET
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Trudeau should stand up for what is right, just as Canada has done all along, and tell China: "Look, if you can not maintain even the minimum of International laws and afford an accused a lawyer and consular visits, then you can not expect to participate in Canada's natural resources!" -- China needs to understand that the laws must be enforced no matter how many rich uncles the perpetrator has. -- With the Huawei fraud a high level ceo lost her judgement of right and wrong and where the red zone was and overruled the warnings of the company's legal department. She used her executive power just the same arbitrary way that the China government has been applying the law with the elite ruling members. == When a high level ceo commits a major crime despite having all the facts then the case must be brought to court, not only to help the ceo realize that the laws are there for a reason but also to help the ceo's teachers and protectors understand that they erred in being a good role model.
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Chris Sundo
Chris Sundo Jan 22, 2019 4:10AM ET
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When the parents (China government) maintains one set of rules for its preferred chronies (the party bosses, their friends, Huawei family) and maintains a separate set of rules for regulars then everyone starts doing what works and loses the feeling for right and wrong. We can clearly see how confused even the China government is about right and wrong when we listen to what comes out of their official channels and how they attempt to reverse brainwash the listeners with faulty logic. -- When the parent (China government) throws itself behind its misbehaving child (Huawei) and attempts to muscle its way against law enforcement (Canada) and threaten the judges and the jury then that parent loses credibility in the community (the world stage and future Huawei customers) and ultimately becomes NOT TRUSTWORTHY with guarding our future data over 5G. --- When the child (Huawei) later operates under the parents' (China) protection then you can bet your lifesavers that China will grab our data.
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David Wong
David Wong Jan 22, 2019 3:12AM ET
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China is smart...they locked up the other two Canadians and gave one a death sentence. So Canada better let her go or the other Canadians will face severe punishment.
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Zhenguo Zhang
Jack_ZZ Jan 22, 2019 12:56AM ET
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“Justin Trudeau previously said China was arbitrarily using the death penalty and called on world leaders to raise concerns about the detained Canadians.”. is this a way to break rule of law?
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George Steven
George Steven Jan 22, 2019 12:56AM ET
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As a Canadian, I don't think it was worth the hassle for Canada. She was lucky to get arrested in Canada. She was on her way to Mexico.
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