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America’s $20 Trillion Debt Pile Is Getting Cheaper as It Grows

ForexSep 11, 2020 07:09AM ET
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America’s $20 Trillion Debt Pile Is Getting Cheaper as It Grows

(Bloomberg) -- The U.S. government is paying less as it borrows more, one reason investors appear more comfortable than Congress about funding another leg of stimulus.Interest payments in the federal budget declined about 10% in the first 11 months of this fiscal year, when America was running up its biggest deficit since World War II. Over the next few years, servicing the national debt will be cheaper than any time in the past half-century when measured against the size of the economy, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

That’s because yields in the $20 trillion U.S. Treasury market plunged to record lows early in the pandemic -- and they’ve risen only slightly since then, even though the supply of debt has surged to a record.Borrowing probably won’t always be this cheap, but for now the U.S. government is far from running up against any financial limits, as it seeks to shore up the economy after a wave of shutdowns and layoffs. Concerns that the country can’t afford much more spending have been voiced by officials from both political parties in recent weeks, as stimulus efforts ground to a halt.

“While there’s been a lot of concern about the mounting debt, it hasn’t caused the problems that were anticipated by the doomsters,” says Ed Yardeni, founder of Yardeni Research Inc. “It’s not just a question of how much debt is outstanding, but what is the cost to service that debt.”

The CBO predicts a deficit of about $3.7 trillion this year, or 16% of GDP, more than triple the year-earlier figures. Bonds issued to fund the shortfall have pushed the U.S. public debt past $20 trillion –- more than the economy’s annual output.

‘Not Stretched’

Yet the average yield on the debt has dropped to 1.7%, from 2.4% in December, and it’s set to fall further.

Even after a few auctions that saw signs of faltering demand, the government can borrow for 30 years at below 1.5%. And the Treasury has tilted sales toward such longer-term securities, helping lock in historically low rates. The latest long-bond auction on Thursday drew a solid bid.

“The U.S.’s debt affordability is quite OK, not stretched by any means,” says Felipe Villarroel, a portfolio manager at TwentyFour Asset Management in London. “We also look at what is the perceived use of the money a government is borrowing, which is now widely accepted as necessary.”The idea that governments need financial-market approval for their budget policies has in any case been called into question.

Anti-Vigilante

Yardeni coined the term “bond vigilantes” in the early 1980s. It described investors who were supposed to exert power over governments by selling their bonds, or merely threatening to, and thus making deficit-spending more expensive.

But now the dominant presence in markets is a kind of anti-vigilante, which does the opposite of all those things: the Federal Reserve.

Fed purchases have siphoned about $1.8 trillion of government debt out of the market since March, while the Treasury was issuing some $3 trillion of new bonds. The central bank is currently adding about $80 billion of Treasuries a month. It’s also promised to keep short-term rates at zero for the foreseeable future and tolerate above-target inflation, while urging the government not to ease up on fiscal stimulus.There’s a broad consensus among bond investors that if rates on longer-term government debt start to creep up, as they’ve occasionally threatened to, then the Fed can and will step in.

‘Still Out There’

“If there were some bond vigilantes still out there to push the bond yields higher,” is how Yardeni puts it, “then the Fed will target the bond yields.”

In an Aug. 31 speech, Fed Vice Chair Richard Clarida left the door open to a policy of capping Treasury yields at some point, though he indicated it’s not imminent.

Even the potential for such a move is helping to keep the government’s borrowing costs down, investors say.The 10-year Treasury note has been trading around 0.7% for weeks, and it’s forecast to end the year within a few basis points of that level, according to Bloomberg surveys.

‘Look Different’

In the financial world there are plenty who argue that the low interest bills America currently pays on its growing debt are just a short-term respite –- like a teaser rate on a jumbo mortgage.

“The Fed is greasing the system to make sure the financial markets are functioning well,” says Gary Pollack, head of fixed-income for private wealth management at Deutsche Bank (DE:DBKGn). “But at some point in time the world will look different, and all of a sudden we are going to be stuck with a huge bill.”That view still carries some weight in Congress too, even if deficit hawks –- Washington’s version of bond vigilantes –- aren’t the force they once were.President Donald Trump’s Republican Party has used its Senate majority to push for scaled-back measures in the next pandemic bill. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has promised more spending if he beats Trump in November’s election, but a senior aide told the Wall Street Journal last month that it’s not clear what America can afford because “the pantry is going to be bare.”

‘Not Worth Anything’

Taking the opposite view is the emerging school of Modern Monetary Theory. It argues that countries like America, which borrow in their own currency, can set the interest rates on their debt as a policy variable –- and don’t really need to sell bonds anyway. The risk is overheating the economy rather than running out of market funds.Also cited by the dovish camp is Japan, which has a national debt about two-and-a-half times bigger than America’s (by comparison with their economies). After more than two decades of low interest rates, its debt-servicing cost is approximately zero.

David Levy, chairman of Jerome Levy Forecasting Center LLC, says that ultimately there are limits to government debt –- but the U.S. is nowhere near hitting them, and has room for more borrowing to pull its economy out of the coronavirus slump.“It would take a long time to get to the type of inflationary scenario where people thought the dollar was not worth anything,” he says. “You can keep this process growing without it breaking down.”

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

America’s $20 Trillion Debt Pile Is Getting Cheaper as It Grows
 

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Comments (13)
Silverbug 19
Silverbug 19 Sep 11, 2020 3:00PM ET
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lol so we don't owe the ever increasing principal wow
alex perez
alex perez Sep 11, 2020 2:02PM ET
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President Ronald Reagan and VP *****Cheney both said "deficits don't matter "..
John Klan
John Klan Sep 11, 2020 1:08PM ET
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Sorry Democrats will block any further stimulus until after President Trump wins the election.
Tre Hsi
Tre Hsi Sep 11, 2020 11:40AM ET
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Trump in 2016: I will eliminate U.S. debt in 8 years (not the budget deficit, the national debt)................https://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/presidential-races/275003-trump-i-will-eliminate-us-debt-in-8-years
Thom Miller
Thom Miller Sep 11, 2020 11:05AM ET
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Trump is under the belief that if he gets re-elected, he can “pardon” the national debt and it will “magically disappear.” At least that’s what he told the paltry turnout at his Michigan rally last night.
David David
David9 Sep 11, 2020 10:38AM ET
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When the dollar breaks down and no longer the world's reserve currency, inflation will explode to double digits and people will lind up and cry everywhere.
Kaveh Sun
Kaveh Sun Sep 11, 2020 10:35AM ET
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Everywhere else rates r lower if not negatives. Bond traders have no choice but to buy usa bonds.
Michael Angelo
Michael Angelo Sep 11, 2020 10:33AM ET
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Don't worry about the debt meanwhile is on dollars, uncle sam print the paper and will keep the default away . The problem will arise when the rest of the world would start thinking is monopoly money. That will begin when us cannot project more power and leadership. Still no country, other than China, is challenging the pole position. May be another virus will cripple our capacity to the bone. Also is time to start thinking on population, unemployment and scarce resources, economy in a word. Politics has no place in it.
Sevantilal Patel
Sevantilal Patel Sep 11, 2020 10:11AM ET
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Who said this. inflation is always and everywhere amonetiry philosopher.
Dave Stein
Dave Stein Sep 11, 2020 9:50AM ET
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something smells like b,s are here.....oh it's the article
Ernie Keebler
Ernie Keebler Sep 11, 2020 9:14AM ET
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Truly a scary time. Downplaying the debt. What happens when the real gdp numbers sink not just this year but next suddenly the debt isn't just 108% of gdp but closer to 200%. The stimulus pumped stock markets are masking the real economy, wake up America.
Alberto Vazquez
Alberto Vazquez Sep 11, 2020 8:58AM ET
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I wish I can apply the same mentality and system at home. What a way to excuse stealing from future generations.
Ronald Warren
Ronald Warren Sep 11, 2020 8:36AM ET
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We are currently 26.75 trillion in debt. Quite personally, I find that number horrifying. This article tries to paint a rosy picture on a ridiculous fiasco! The government is predicting a shortfall of 3.7 trillion for our next budget year. Now we're at 30.5 trillion. Let's start adding some more stimulus! What happens when we default on all this?
Leo ley
Leo ley Sep 11, 2020 8:36AM ET
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Is really horrifying. The sad part is that today 45% of Americans are not prepared at all... by 2025, 50% of Americans will be obese. that means a lot of health problems.... the next coming years will be really sad
Michael Angelo
Michael Angelo Sep 11, 2020 8:36AM ET
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the problem is what you finance with it, used to finance current deficits is the big problem. Look at South America for example.
 
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